HYÈRES FESTIVAL: THE INTERVIEWS

Presided over by Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, this year the jury of the Hyères Festival selected ten finalists who presented their men or women collections at the marvelous Villa Noailles. We had the honour of interviewing two other young designers including Japanese Kenta Matsushige, winner of the Grand Prix of the Jury of the 29th edition

Kenta MatsushigeJapan

Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, Paris (ecole-couture-parisienne.com) – Womenswear

What are the inspirations behind your collection?
This collection is inspired by the Japanese word Hinabi, which refers to pastoral beauty in opposition to Miyabi, the urban beauty. That concept gave me the opportunity to draw inspiration from Japanese artists who work in the countryside. I travelled a lot and I also went to Naoshima, an important island known for its modern art museums, architecture and sculptures. In that island recently opened the Ando Museum, dedicated to Japanese architect Ando Tadao and some technical aspects of my pieces have been inspired by his work. In general my collection is a mix between countryside beauty and minimalism. Regarding the colours palette, the soft tones such as dove-grey, pale yellow or water green confer to the pieces a kind of serenity.

What does it mean for you to have been shortlisted at Hyères?
I’m really happy to be here. This festival is very famous for new talents and gave us a huge visibility within the industry. I decided to develop a collection specifically for the Hyères Festival and I hope my work will be appreciated.

Which are the things that inspire you most?
Art and architecture are my favourite sources of inspirations.

Future projects?
I live and work in Paris and in the future I would love to launch my own brand in this city.

 

Anne KluytenaarNetherlands

ArtEZ Institute of the Arts, Arnhem (artez.nl) – Menswear

What are the inspirations behind your collection?
I got the inspiration 3 years ago when my father told me that he was actually a woman and he wanted to begin living his life in a feminine way. What makes me fascinated about this thing is that he was a very masculine guy before and from one moment to the next he started to wear women clothes. He was not aware of the differences between a man body and a women body and so he used to wear a lot of volumes on his shoulders and very slim pencil skirts excessively exaggerating his body. As a fashion design student I started doing womenswear inspired by menswear, but then I thought what could happen if I turn it around because a women can look very nice and elegant in a men suit but when you put a men in a dress it doesn’t work so I just wanted to see what I could do working with details, patterns in a way that a dress on a guy can still look masculine. As an example the trousers of my collection are made in a very tailored and masculine way, but then the fabric is very feminine.

What does it mean for you to have been shortlisted at Hyères?
It’s amazing, a huge honour. I didn’t expect to be selected. When I sent my work I thought it was too messy, then I was shortlisted and I am super happy to be here.

Which are the things that inspire you most?
Art, materials, books and literature. Everything can trigger something.

Future projects?
Hopefully a new collection and make my brand works. I would like to continue to push the boundaries away of the idea that a men garment like pants can be made only in a traditional male way, with masculine fabrics. My view is that menswear can also be feminine in small details. I want to design for men that don’t want to be women, that are masculine from the inside and even if they are wearing a pink jacket with a skirt they are still guys.